EFWMA Administrative Staff
 
 email
Joyce Brown
Director
(817) 496-3003 
 
 
email  
Rachel Sanders
Assistant Director
(817) 496-3003  ext: 303
email  
 
 
Sukai Durosimi            
Superintendent
(817) 496-3003

 
 
 email
Corliss Bunkley
Vice Principal            
(817) 496-3003

 email
Beverly Moore        
Business Manager                       
(817) 496-3003       

 email
 
 
Bernie Bermudez    
Food & Nutrition Manager
(817) 496-3003
                                   
 
 email
 
Janice Taylor
District Registrar
(817) 496-3003
 
 
 email
Elma Aida Aguilar
Bilingual Campus Coordinator/Human Resource Manager
(817) 496-3003
 
 
EFWMA STAFF - To send an email, just click on their name and proceed.  Please review our email communication policies at the end of this list.  Thank you!
 
 
 
Technology Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
6-9 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
 
6-9 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Math Coach/VP
(817) 496-3003
 
First grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Office Assist.
(817) 496-3003 ext: 200
  
Fares, Hanan
6-9 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Foster, Sarian
Literacy Coach
(817) 496-3003
 
CNP Staff
(817) 496-3003
 
5th Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003 
 
3-6 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
4th Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
5th Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003 
 
Second Graade Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Librarian
(817) 496-3003
 
Long, Amanda
Third Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003
   
ESL Support/Montessori Specialist
(817) 496-3003
 
Moak, Renee
Math Coach/Tutor TOTMA
(817) 496-3003
 
PEIMS Admin/Finance Asst.
(817) 496-3003
 
ESL Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Mubasa, Erika
Special Education Teacher
(817) 496-3003 
 
Mowery, Mandy
PreK/Kindergarten Teacher
(817)496-3003 
 
Teacher Assistant
(817) 496-3003  
 
3-6 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Literacy Coach/Tutor TOTMA
(817) 496-3003
  
Shifflette, Donna
3-6 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
1st - 3rd Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003 
 
Staniforth, Sharon
4th Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
OLE Coordinator, G/T Coordinator, Administrative Support
(817) 496-3003  
 
Groundskeeper
(817 496-3003
 
CNP Staff
(817) 496-3003
  
Building and Maintenance Mgr.
(817) 496-3003 x310
 
Fourth Grade Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
Art/Music Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
6-9 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496 - 3003 
 
CNPAide
(817) 496-3003 
 
Teacher Assistant
(817) 496-3003
 
6-9 Montessori Teacher
(817) 496-3003
 
 
Please follow the e-mail etiquette for EFWMA
 
We all want to experience the benefits of electronic mail in a way that is most effective, efficient and polite. Since electronic mail is a relatively recent development in communications, a standard of usage has not been chiseled in stone. There are a few courtesies and customs to guide you in your use of electronic mail, however, and these are listed below.

Since they also represent general good practice for written communication, you might consider them the next time you use either electronic or hard copy mail.

Be considerate with length. Too much information in one message is a burden on recipients. Bear in mind that screens are harder to read than words on paper.

Consider the presentation of your message:
  • Writing in all uppercase letters tends to convey anger or shouting.
  • Breaking up text using short lines and paragraphs and spaces is helpful in keeping your message readable.
  • Using lists and indentation helps make your points stand out clearly.
  • Keep your message focused. If a new topic is introduced it should be under a separate message with a new subject heading.
  • Indicate the specific topic of your mail message in the subject field. Clear subject headings make everyone's lives easier, helping with prioritizing, filing, cataloging, cross-referencing, and retrieval.
  • Remember that you may be sending mail to readers with varying levels of expertise. Some of your readers may not understand terminology that is familiar to you.
  • Pay attention to the distribution list before forwarding received mail to someone else. The recipient might have several copies of that item already.
  • It is important to balance informing those who need to know with sending information to too many people. Send a carbon copy to those who may be affected by your message or who may have information or suggestions to add.
Although electronic mail promises "instant" delivery, it does not guarantee an instant response! If you are uncertain of a recipient's electronic mail habits or are not getting any response to your messages, a phone call may be quicker and more effective.
  • Try to acknowledge receipt of a message promptly, especially if it is going to take considerable time to reply fully. Let the sender know that you will answer.
  • Avoid trivial or unnecessary responses. As a receiver, it is not necessary to reply to every mail message.
  • When replying to a message sent to multiple addresses it is usual to respond to the sender only. That the person then collates replies for the group as a whole.
  • In a reply, include the relevant parts of the original message for clarity, but keep the quotations to a minimum. Otherwise, simply attach the original message.
  • Refrain from adding too many attachments to your electronic mail. Large, bulky messages tie up the network and are difficult to read.
  • Cite your information clearly and correctly, even if you are paraphrasing. If you are sending information from another source, pay attention to whether the material is copyrighted. Copyright laws apply to electronic mail as well as to printed media.
Also, don't forward or edit an e-mail message without the original sender's consent. This is particularly important in the case where the sender may consider the contents sensitive.
  • Don't rush writing your electronic messages. To organize your thoughts you might want to draft a particularly important message in a word processor. Use the automated spell-check to make sure your text is error-free.
  • Avoid using the electronic mail system to send junk mail or widely broadcast information unnecessarily.
The diversity of backgrounds, cultures, opinions, and writing abilities in the electronic mail community sometimes makes it difficult to understand one another:

  • Assume the messages you send and receive are permanent and public.
  • Don't say anything in electronic mail that you would not want to be made public or forwarded to others.
  • Be aware that electronic mail might not be as private as you may wish. If confidentiality and privacy are important, it may be advisable and more appropriate to use other communication vehicles.
  • Try to keep in mind that writing styles may cause some messages to come across as sounding abrupt or even antagonistic when that is not the intention of the sender.
  • Take time to read and fully comprehend what has been written before you reply, especially if the message provokes a strong emotional response. If you don't understand a particular item, ask the sender for clarification before replying to an incorrect conclusion.
Electronic mail cannot replace personal contact. There is a tendency to be less formal or careful which can sometimes provoke anger.  Remember that direct person-to-person contact is best for handling sensitive, difficult, complex, or emotional issues.
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